Carbon Trust loan for

Published:  21 June, 2010

Astrum, a designer and manufacturer of track links and structural components for armoured fighting vehicles and heavy duty earth moving vehicles, replaced its ageing air compressors with new CompAir units. It is claimed the new equipment will halve the company's energy use and increase productivity, but it will also reduce its carbon emissions by over 600 tonnes a year.

Working with Air Energy Management, Astrum developed a bespoke system to 'switch off" air compressor drive motors, where possible.  The £400,000 system has reduced the demand on compressed air, and replaced old, large air compressors with two more efficient smaller CompAir compressors.  Low pressure drop piping and a leak detection programme are also being installed. 

The system will reduce Astrum’s energy demand by 1,255,000 kWh per annum once the project is completed.

Colin Mander, managing director of CompAir UK said: "With industry averages claiming that energy costs account for up to 80% of the total cost of ownership of a compressor over its lifetime, the need to reduce power consumption remains, as ever, a high priority.

“The two variable-speed compressors supplied are configured to match air supply to plant demand, so Astrum is assured of maximum energy performance at all times.  In addition both machines are supplied with our Assure extended warranty as standard.”

The Carbon Trust loan was provided as part of a drive to provide small and medium businesses with zero-cost capital to invest in new high performance, energy efficient equipment.”

For further information please visit: www.compair.co.uk

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